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below 2% gdp and bring down national debt dead relative to size relative to size of the economy in 10 years. brewster the nation's fiscal cut that tax loopholes that take a fair and balanced approach. at the same time the budget incorporates elements to speaker by last december. they make the difficult choices to find common ground. consistent with that offer come in the budget includes being the president would not put forward such as means testing command that a character in a related premiums and the more accurate the less generous measure of inflation. it includes proposals only so they come together around a complete and comprehensive package to shrink the deficit by $1.8 trillion over 10 years and are meant the fiscal uncertainty that hampers economic growth and job creation. this remark does not represent the starting point for negotiation. represent tagamet savings and additional roadrunners for those of the. the two cannot be separated and were not separated last december when we were close to a bipartisan agreement. this budget provides achievable solutions to fiscal p
a majority in congress since 1997. the mexican economy has expanded mexican have maintained growth since 2009. fromdp has increased $7,979 in 2009, to 2146 in 2011. in purchasing above 15,500. on gdp growth, almost four%, a higher rate, and is expected to grow 3.5% in the year. this is measured by j.p. morgan. mexico is also taking care of its people. the brookings institution has highlighted that 60% of mexicans are middle class. by 2030, 80.5% of mexicans will be middle class. housing has increased more in the early 1's. all of these factors that have taken place review the immigration pressures of the past. academic think tanks estimate that net migration between mexico and the united states is close to zero. a recent survey shows only 11% of mexicans say they would leave mexico if given the opportunity. a decline of about half from a 31% 2007. -- in 2007. over the last few years, our common border has increasingly become an area of prosperity. more more dynamic and secure than it has ever been. four in the united states and six in mexico, have a population of 92 minute -- 90 million peopl
enough to keep united states competitive in our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion about what is going on in america, i travel to germany where i met a man who gave me -- who told me how things were done in germany compared to america. there are many specialist in america, but our system in germany is very dynamic. our workers are used in very many areas of the work. my american rent was supplies -- see the same staff. all three eggs are learned in the apprenticeship area it is the world -- apprenticeship. >> apprenticeship? not good enough? i needed an explanation. that is what i spoke to the headmaster of whence mr. -- of westminster academy. >> one of the challenges is that changing. it was a time in which the mother, father, children, could be the home in which they would be growing up with both parents. now when students go to school they only have one parent or there are issues in the home, they are bringing those challenges into the classroom. i think what schools should do is help children love to learn, love to read, become thinkers. become problem solvers.
manufacturing sector, creating new jobs and growing the economy for american families. energy is the foundation of our economy. we need to focus on the promise of prosperity. north american energy prosperity and the abundance that it offers to our country. america's greatness is tied to our freedom to produce and build things. republicans have a plan to grow our economy by making america a nation of builders once again. we want to streamline our government, cut red tape, and unleash the power of north american energy. with these things we can revitalize american manufacturing, and foster long-term economic growth and job creation for our citizens. lastly, we're determined to get to the truth regarding the terrorist attack on our nation's in benghazi, libya. in which three americans lost their lives. last year, i directed five committees to look at there is parts of this investigation. the next week, these committees will provide a comprehensive progress report on the investigation up to now. and this progress report will not represent the conclusion of their investigation, but it will be the be
and the free enterprise piece of this which gives our economy most vigor and i would advise people that are preparing to take the nationalization test, that's a choice by the educational foundation to understand our history and language, one of the questions that will be there, what is the economic system of the united states? the answer to that is free enterprise capitalism. that's what gives our economy its vigor. and when we move away, when we move towards government management of our economy, government bailouts, government deciding who is too big to allow o fail, so much of our economy loses its vigor and we lose some of the promise of the great american civilization. another piece of this also that i speak to relatively often, mr. speaker, and that is american vigor and last component of the american exceptionalism that i'll list here tonight. american vigor, where does that come from? well, we have natural-born american citizens that are part of the civilization and culture. and they are -- and these natural-born american citizens are the did he sent ants who came here with
. part of it is the economy. improving economy in the united states tends to attract people as well. we just haven't seen that, but monitor those flms -- numbers. we have -- the thing that troubles me the most is the smugglers who do this for profit, who are taking creative routes either up through the bahamas, we're seeing haitians being run through puerto rico right now. so it's a constant battle as the smugglers get smarter and daring. they are smaller than the land border. >> the smuggler industry, for lack of a better term, is that on the increase, is that on the decrease? what's the trend? it's an recollection spencive undertaking. my understanding is they charge thousands of dollars per person they bring. is that something we've seen an increase in or decrease and if we've seen a decrease, is it because of economic factors? how do we stop these? it sounds like a fast boat through the middle of the caribbean is not something we would necessarily stop. >> i think flow of migrants, it's similar to the flow of drugs. people are very creative. yes, we've seen an increase in those peop
workers is significant in our stagnant economy. the unemployment rate for blacks without a high school diploma was 12 percent, today, it's more than doubled, to 24.6%. now, that clearly shows that we have an oversupply of low skilled labor relative to the -- that is for workers in all such classes, particularly black americans, because research shows that 40 percent of the 18-point percentage decline in the employment rates of black males is attributable to illegal immigration. that's hundreds of thousands of blacks without jobs. it translates to hundreds of thousands who can't pay taxes, who don't support their families on their own dime. the evidence also indicated that in addition to the pressing wage -- sorry, employment levels, illegal immigration drove down wage levels, by the federal reserve bank of atlanta, for example, showed that illegal immigration, and the spike in illegal immigration, was attributable to the nearly $960 per year decrease in wage levels of documented georgians. and the leisure and hospitality industries, it was $1520. for doctors and lawyers, $960 may not b
market since the start of this cycle. weakness in oil could portend investors worries that the economies are slowing down not just in china but globally as well. so that will probably put pressure on the market. the other thing too, we're in the earnings season and this might be the quarter that doesn't delight. that is that we do get some dispoints manned -- disappointments and we get stiff reactions to the disappointments. lori: bob, you were cautious yet looking for stocks to show gains for the year. what do you think will get us past these bumps in the road? >> i think the bumps in the road should not be unexpected. the market is up 20% since last june. so it is not unusual to have a five to 7% correction at this stage. following on gene's comments, we are in earnings season. interesting when you look this year, i think that will be stimulus for further correction. expectations are 5% increase over last year for this quarter. 7% for the second quarter. 18% for the third quarter and 28 for the fourth. i think as companies report, analysts will be really focused on what the guidance be
. it is the perfect example of the program benefits for the economy and local community where jobs are scarce and a part of vermont where conventional lending is not an option. we appreciate the inclusion of permanent authorization of this important program. we also very much appreciate inclusion of the reforms to the program, highly important to employers in the seasonal industries. ski resorts in the winter, beach communities and this summer rely on these workers to not -- and not only prove to be excellent employees but bring a cultural experience to states that do not necessarily enjoyed a great deal of diversity. when a trained employee can return for several years in a row, it is a great benefit to all. we thank you for including the sections into the bill. in order to enhance security while adding -- in order to enhance security while also facilitating legitimate travel and trade, we strongly support the addition of but 3500 custom boer patrol officers included in the legislation. in order to ensure that officers are allocated properly, we urge the committee to work with cpb to specify
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
to get worse. their economy looks just absolutely horrible. stuart: they give very much, indeed. a very clean cut opinion. we appreciate that. thank you very much. the opening bell coming up 20 seconds from now. maybe a gain of ten-15 points. please remember we were down 138 points yesterday. 352,000 new claims for unemployment insurance. that was last week. that is a relative high number. nothing like what you expected. firing trend, the layoff trend still very much with us. we opened 11 points higher. now, we are up 23. let's get right to it. apple. where did it open today? nicole petallides. nicole: at least they have an up arrow today. we have to keep a close eye on apple. people who own apple not only is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault right up front. that is what we were looking for. nicole: for dollars four cents. yesterday, we broke below
's almost always because of fears about a steep slow down in the economy. now, it's the global economy. yeah, the worries used to be the united states centric. and perhaps the economy had been growing too hot. and the fed was raising rates. perhaps the monthly employment numbers showed a sudden reduction as we saw in the late summer of 2007, which ushered in the great recession. maybe there is a shocking shutdown in retail sales. now, i'm not saying that every single selloff plays out like this, but the vast majority of them actually really do. of course, lately we have a new element. we are all one world these days and a slow down in china is now greeted as more of a threat to our stock market than an actually slow down here in the united states. crazy. but it's true. when you get these kind of jitters, which include the requisite collapse in commodities like oil and copper and the markets sell, sell, sell, can't be combatted overnight because it's so horrendous, it does kind of paralyze things. but here's what happens. certain sectors stabilize a lot faster than others. particularly if the
know you're aware that six of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world are located in sub-saharan africa, and it is my hope to the extent possible that the state department will prioritize trade with the african nation. you should know that we have a bipartisan bicameral effort working in conjunction with chairman smith to quickly put forward a renewal of the africa growth and opportunity act. so i have four questions i would like to ask you. i wanted to know what steps are you taking to focus on africa's extraordinary growth potential? what are your thoughts about the u.s. appointing a special envoy to the drc? does the request for peacekeeping operations accurately reflect the growing needs on the continent? and can you comment on the significance of the 6% cut to usaid hiv/aids funding? >> thank you very much, congresswoman. let me emphasize first of all that we were really pleased that pepfar was able to be held whole. i think that's vital. i have personally visited, i was in durbin, north of durbin, in the mountains watching of the program is being effectively adminis
economy both coming in, you know, more bearish than expectations. what can they do. positive for interest rates. on the other side, we still -- melissa: you think they will step in and do more easing in europe? >> they will cut interest rates. little impact because interest rates are already low. what we need is measures. the ecb could loan some money. melissa: that is an interesting perspective. we are quite bullish on the u.s. economy. we are positive. thinking would be good. this will account for some of the assets. melissa: thank you so much for coming on. lori: we have some updated news for the housing market today. rising 1.5%. that is just shy of the estimates. the pace has increased by 18.5% from year ago. bonuses are getting smaller. they are caving to regulators and scaling back bonuses. the trade journal said the fed started calling banks last year about compensation plans. jon corzine facing a lawsuit now over the collapse of mf global. he is being sued by louie freed. the lawsuit alleges that corzine engaged in risky trading practices. melissa: a vote of confidence and a big
unemployment. and she revolutionized the economy with free-market ideas in her ten years of service that ushered in a new decade of prosperity. when she took office, the top income tax rate was 83%. it was cut to 60% and then to 40%. the middle tax rate was cut to 30%. and the lowest tax rate was eliminated altogether. when she took office, the top corporate tax rate was 53%. she cut it to 35%. the top capital gains tax rate was a stifling 75%. thatcher cut it to 30%. and as a result, a progrowth policies, unemployment fell from a high of 12% early in her tenure to 7.5% near the end. public spending as a percentage of g.d.p. fell from 45.1% of g.d.p. to 39.4% of g.d.p. and inflation fell from almost 22% in 1979 to a low rate of 2.4% in 1986. but perhaps the most telling tribute to margaret thatcher's leadership is that three days after she gave her britain await speech, that heroic speech she was dubbed "the iron lady" in the communist news outlet "the red star." when your military enemies are describing you as formidable as the iron lady, it indicates that you're winning the argume
% of poll, only americans think that control is an important problem mostly economy in general, 24% think that is most important. federal budget deficit and federal debt is 11%. here is the front page of "the new york daily news," -- lindsay is an independent here in washington d.c.. you are on "washington journal." am really sad and i want to make sure if one does in this country that 31,000 people per year are killed by guns. this is a normal and we did this is a horrible number for its allies civilization. horrible number for a civilization. stronger gun laws can make a difference. calling in.you for this is the front page of " the washington times." michael is from rockville center, new york. caller: the reason this legislation failed is not only would it have not prevented the terrible tragedy that occurred in connecticut but also the tragedy in colorado. abroad is lacking because it would appear both parties have used this issue to raise money and at the same time not really address it responsibly. i think most americans are on to the fact that would appear you bringin -- that what
will go. and sometimes invest in a place where the economy is not where it would support necessarily a market solution, which is why a.i.d. has to be there. so you've got the millennium challenge corporation over here, a.i.d. as the preponderance of our expenditure, but it has adopted significant reforms in the last years that have actually movement some of the development challenge kinds of enterprize into a.i.d. wherever we can we are trying to do economic-based aid in a local way that is sustainable. and that will result in long-term gains, not a project that comes, and when the project's over the money's gone and there is nothing to show for it. but there are someplaces where you still have humanitarian demands and other demands that will not lend themselves to that, and we just need to understand that. we have to understand that's for the minimum -- minimalist fraction of the percentage of our aid that may represent, it's still an expression of our values and interest and it's important. now we are -- i'm not going to sit here and tell this committee that the job is done. we are
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
result. also what i liked is some of the bright spots that we see in an otherwise challenged economy. namely, the recovery of housing, particularly in our big housing states of california and florida. this has put an underpinning under consumer confidence and we see the preassumption of home construction, the energy situation in texas is very strong, lead to go an increase in pickup truck sales for us of plus 18%. we also had significant acquisitions in the quarter. in both phoenix and dallas, revenue run rate of 250 million, which when combined with last quarter is now over 800 million of acquisitions within the last six months and is, finally, and last but not leaf least, we've branded 0% of the company now under the flag of auto nation and the branded markets, even though we walked away from some names that were 80 years old, improved share right out of the box. >> that's what i was thinking, you know, wayne has been trying to get you to do that for a while and you finally listen to him and then you get the best quarter ever. >> yeah, you know, i should always listen to wayne soon
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the blast, wheelchairs and stretchers were ferrying victims up and down boylston street, the home stretch of the oldest marathon race in the world. amid the chaos competitors, race volunteers and spectators ran from the scene in shock. >> i went over there. there were body parts. people were blown apart. they're dead. where the wind owe is, the windows were all blown out. >> ifill: the attack came about thr
by a saggy economy, energy blackouts, and frustration from his labor union base. fewer than 900,000 signatures were needed to launch the recall. it took only 65 signatures and $3,500 to get on the ballot. aside from the two candidates a cast of more than 100 characters ended up on the ballot from the famous arnold schwarzenegger arianna huffington, and larry flynt, to the onabsurd. a primary system that now rewards the top two vote getters regardless of party, and taking responsibility for drawing district boundaries away from lawmakers and giving it to state -- senator's panel. joining me now is joe garofoli. welcome back into "the war room." >> i object to calling gary coleman absurd. >> michael: yeah you could have said what are you walking about? how did this turn into this major recall. >> there was a very low turnout for the previous election very nasty where gray davis was up for reelection so the bar was low to have a recall. you had the energy crisis people thought davis bungled it he passed a vehicle license fee to raise money, because the economy w
dollar deficits, to a fledgeling economy and declining military -industrial base. we can now add to that the devastating effects of sequestration to our servicemen and women. sequestration is the wrong approach to bring in spending, particularly as our nation's military readiness will foolishly suffer. however, we are under sequestration. and i hope you can clarify for me some of its impacts. we have recently heard that the army has canceled seven combat center training rotations, the navy has canceled ship deployments. air force has stood 12 combat-coded squad rons, not to mention potential civilian furloughs for up to 14 days all due to sequestration and i hope you can translate that into the real world for us, including what that means in terms of readiness and force posture. we'll continue to wrestle with these issues with you. i'm very happy and pleased to see during the fiscal 2013 c.r. that we were able to include the full year defense and veterans -- milcon and veterans bills, giving you some much needed flexibility in funding for d.o.d. past three years we worked across
discussion we dp, i understd how important refming our immigration system is to our economy and our national security. i cannot support immigration reform if we cannot be satisfied we have secured the border. getting that chicks were we can talk about how we are doing -- getting the metrics were we can talk how we are doing will be critical to getting my support and others. we look forward to working with you to come up with a definitive metrics. chairman of the transportation of security and subcommittee, i'm interested in the tsa budget. i will direct my questions in that direction. it seems logical as we are moving toward risk-based security with the tsa. the thing i have always supported. i support that. it seems to me we have moved theres security and should be significant costs saving for the taxpayer as he do risk-based screening and focus more on threat that ought to free up resources. we can look at the high-tech baggage screening. we would need a lesson screeners for baggage. software upgrades. the gun, we should be able to resource -- redo some of the workforce there. -- again, we
that people view as specific predictors of where the economy is going. and again, you can see while it did go down in august of 2012, we've essentially had six straight months of either flat or up and then we had a down. and, again, we would normally want to see something like three months of a trend before we made too much of this. but the fact is, that's not -- it's not a good news. so the question is, well, why is this happening? we've had -- first we've had soft spots in the economy for the last two or three springs. might be another one of those. but you have had the payroll tax increase go into effect. you've had sequestration go into effect. you have no growth in people's incomes. that was the more disappointing numbers out of the last unemployment insurance report. and if people don't have money, they can't spend money. and finally, we're being affected in the slowdown in europe in particular and the slowdown in the emerging markets. our export growth has fallen to about zero at the moment because there isn't demand overseas for our products. so it feels like a little bit of a soft sp
of the current sanctions regime against iran? >> it is having a huge impact on our economy. no question with any measure you use inflation, unemployment, and availability of commodities having a tremendous impact by any measure that said it just yet has not induced changes in policy. >> to both of you relative to pakistan has pakistan changed its strategic calculation with respect to afghanistan and more specifically is there any change that we have determined and pakistan so far and willingness to deal with the afghan talnba which is the sanctuary in pakistan? . i believe they will continue to do. >> there's no gene's we have discerned a pakistan and so far their unwillingness to take on the taliban and -- >> inside pakistan, the sort to the tattered ban on pakistan to assist a threat to the pakistanis and they have, when they could -- they have also need to point out, last thousands of troops and the thought in pursuit of militants. >> i'm talking about the afghan military and. >> that's correct. >> is there any change in not? >> not basically. >> in terms of north korea, you've indicated i be
, with difficulty in keeping together the chavez coalition in resolving the deep problems of the economy in light of a devaluation in resolving the atrocious situation of crime and violence in the country. how he will keep those very factions of the party together and at the same time tackle these very deep seated problems is really a big question. i think it leaves open the possibility for a great deal more instability. >> suarez: it sounds like it's going to be difficult to run venezuela, whoever takes the loath of president. 30-plus percent inflation, high crimes. those facts. >> 20% last year. it's picked up a little in the last few months but or significantly in the last few months. i think that was part of the problem for maduro. i think there are serious challenges ahead. we don't want to exaggerate them too much. for 14 years, the business press has been saying that the venezuelan economy is going to collapse. it never did. it won't either. they always say it's unsus sanable. that's what we had in 2006 when you have an $8 trillion housing bubble and anybody who is looking at it which did
of this economy that are going strong? like housing. a totally domestic industry. not france, not generation not socgen. that's not going to be droild by european woes or a chinese slowdown. they have nothing to do with each other. the housing comeback is still with us. as we know from yesterday's terrific housing starts number. and this is the kind of huge multiyear theme that's going to keep powering forward no matter what you're fretting about. take a look at this chart of new housing starts. you can see that we're very much on the upswing. but we still have a long way to go before we reach the elevated levels that we saw back in 2005-2006. so how do we play the housing resurgence? right now what do we do? what can we snoen what about realogy? a huge realtor that's the world's largest fran schooizer of residential real estate brokerages. coldwell banker, century 21, sotheby's, better homes and garde gardens. last year this company was involved in more thain quarter of all domestic home sales transactions that involved the broker. they are that big. they came public back on october 27th. i
of household 1.4%. there is a huge gap. and the companies are doing well the economy is picking up the middle class is still stuck. why is the economy stock? >> you spoke to a wide variety of spectrum from the the very rich to those in the middle class and the working class. they all share this concern which is surprising to me that i would think that the upper class feels insulated? certainly, they feel as though the enormous amounts of money they are making city group compared the inequality of wealth in america to it 16th century spain. this is the bank, itself. and yes, i was surprised myself. and i am talking about the jewish community center on monday night, uc-berkeley on tuesday. i've spoken to labor groups, and some extremely wealthy people in florida, north in virginia. almost everywhere were all i find is that it is deeply trouble is that there's something really wrong in this country. yes, there is an exception and acceptance of inequality of income but now, it is 400 times the top one person is getting thicker% of the capital gains from the capital market. that is they're getting
the improving economy, more people with more jobs so they can make their payments. it's also banks modifying more loans. restructuring them with lower interest rates or other better terms to help keep families in their homes. >> we have seen foreclosures stick near historic highs for some time. but now as modification efforts or actually ramping back up again and the process is starting to move at least in some areas. we're starting to see that inventory decrease. >> but there is still a way to go before the nation's housing crisis is behind us. lps estimates in a healthy economy, the number of noncurrent mortgages would be about half again their level of last month. shepard? >> peter, thanks. turns out the biggest rip offs in vegas may not be the slot machines at all. last year sin city taxicab drivers overcharged passengers by teeflghts nearly $15 million. according to clark county audit. nearly quarter of those rides, the driver took the scene nic route in order to run occupy the meter. no response by the taxicab required to respond. neighborhood gas line explodes and tops our news across
, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ to enjoy all of these years. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> continuing to cover bombings in boston. getting new developments, information about the device or one of the devices we understand. susan candiotti in new york on the line. what have you been hearing, susan? >> reporter: michael a federal law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation is telling us that investigators now believe that one of the bombs appears to have been placed inside a metal pressure cooker that was hidden inside a backpack.
said, joe. she marked a total sea change in britain's relationship with the market economy before she came into power and anything that was considered important in the post-war british era was controlled by the state. nobody would do that today. she had a very permanent difference in the way britain see the mark of the economy and we are now a country which is the product of margaret thatcher's economic vision. >> steve rattner, i have been amused by commentary coming out of great britain one after another after another kr criticizing margaret thatcher on how she took on the unions and there is that line it had to be done. you were a "the new york times" reporter there. you have said the margaret thatcher is why great britain is great britain today and not italy or spain or greece. >> look. i agree. to me, it seems very clear that when she did was to save great britain from economic irrelevance and i think what may explain a little bit of the difference between the british view and the american view is that what she did was radical by british standards because britain had moved so clo
vulnerable to the attacks on networks critical to our economy with national security iran and north career trying to get capabilities is cyberspace and widely to be responsible for some such attacks. china and russia possess capabilities for cyber theft such as intellectual property as well as the more traditional properties of as the niosh such as spying on a military weapon systems and capabilities. cconology and with cyber theft is us rafts that -- stuffed that cannot be tolerated to hear about the problem and the steps weshldak thesa pacific region from the dictatorial regime has caused ce here the und stat and our allah --alies in h pacific that has announced itinterntme plutonium production and testing a nuclear device in february that appears to have a greater yield of the previous test and has threatened any time to launch a missile like a further is s -- exacerbate tensions we read about conflicting intelligence assessments and north korea's ability to put a nuclear warhead with a long-range missile. we hope our witnesses could clear that issue up. in the middle east iran contin
immigration can affect the u.s. economy. a hearing on friday. then on monday a second hearing. after that we have to see how the process unfolds. especially republicans on the judiciary committee are calling for more than the currently scheduled hearings. probably sometime in early may we will move to the markup process which is where the senators on the judiciary committee can begin offering amendments and releasing how they want to continue to shape the bill. we hope it gets passed out of committee and go to the senate floor. host: rebekah kaplan of the national journal. wilmington, north carolina, kathleen is on our democrat line. is roberta our guest aplan.rebecca caller: my biggest fear is that our country is in a state of fear. thing wehe worst could ever have as americans. we have based our country from the beginning of a great work ethic. there are so many things we could do instead of being frightened every time something happens. domestically, foreman, and immigration. we have a statue of liberty that does welcome everybody. i believe that we should give some amnesty, because of am
a billion dollars a day. it's a big economy. the ninth largest in the economy. on friday everything stopped. businesses closed. public transit shut down. 16 of the areas 35 colleges canceled classes. most taxis were off the road. shopping centers were shut. and, and people, you know, may have worked from home. maybe they took the day off. but others could have been busier. thousands of law enforcement officials, hospital workers, hotel employees, they've worked overtime. some dunkin' donuts franchises stayed open reportedly at the request of first responders. there are insurance claims businesses can file for terrorism related losses if it's covered under the policy. but it's going to be difficult for a lot of small businesses to get back all that revenue and meet payroll. so for some businesses, they are really feeling the pain of last week. for others, though, it was a very, very busy, busy week. it just depends on where you are in the spectrum of business in boston. >> terrorism related losses. >> that's right. >> remarkable, isn't it? what's the one thing we need to know about our money
it is desperate times, bring desperate acts. >> stephanie: rush limbaugh tried to say it is the obama economy. obviously somebody is frustrated because it is a bad economy. >> to your point us, everyone feels their home pain more so than they do others. i am certain that in other countries where the bombings happen regularly there is a certain amount of shrugging going on when they happen on our soil because they've experienced them so harshly. and not by americans acting upon them. their own local sectarian violence creates these kind of situations and when they look at -- were it to be homegrown in our case, they would say this is something we deal with. you're going to feel your home pain more so than you're ever going to understand. that's natural. the question -- >> stephanie: richard -- we were talking about george bush saying i'm comfortable with my decisions about the iraq war which, of course was his response to 9-11. >> he didn't make any. >> stephanie: but the point is, i think it was just yesterday there was some bomb that killed zillions more people in iraq than -- so you're righ
private initiative to the economy, and reagan realized that. you don't find out about this at the reagan library but reagan met with gorbachev at reykjavik, famously, and the two almost agreed to nuclear disarmament. the reaganites in the defense department were horrified by this and put a stop to it but reagan didn't go all the way with reaganism when he had a chance to end the cold war, especially the nuclear threats. so it's a hard-core republican belief. if you remember the pup pup prime -- republican primaries of 2012, it was not that long ago there were eight or ten republican candidates in simi valley for a debate at the reagan library and every one of them said reagan set the example how maring be strong, reagan did with the soviet union and we should do it today in iran, we should do it -- we were right toy trite in iraq. america should use its power to achieve its spend destroy its enemies. i worked in the cold war and in the middle east. you have 29% of the american people agree with that today. >> richard, do you want to say something? you're leaning forward. >> no. >> okay.
, the economy, health care, immigration, all tough issues. people often ask me why i care so much about assault weapons, why i have stayed with this issue for more than 20 years now? the answer is this: in my view, the proliferation of this specific type of weapon goes to the heart of what kind of society in which we want to live. it goes to what kind of culture we're going to raise our children in. and that, mr. pres, brings us to the horrific massacre at newtown, connecticut, four months ago. sandy hook -- and a lot has been said about it, but i can't forget it. sandy hook was a safe school in a safe town. candidly, it was inconceivable that such a tragedy could happen there, but it did. i can't exaggerate how this senseless murder of 20 beautiful young children and six incredibly brave adults affected me and millions around this country. i think it's fair to say that this event really shocked the conscience of america. the pictures of these little victims still bring tears to the eyes of millions. i have been very impressed with one page of the "new york daily news," and i carry it when i ta
for inviting me today. the postal service plays an incredible role in the american economy it provides a national platform that every business and president relies on in the directly supports and 800 billion-dollar manning industry that employs 8 million people. america needs a financially healthy postal service. it needs a service that can adapt to changes and technology and the habits of american consumers. it needs a postal service that inspires confidence in the future. today the postal service faces tremendous financial challenge its ss model is not flexible and the future we lack the authority t fulfil our responsibilities to the great nation. unfortately bill all that controls the actions do not provthoryo t flexibility for it to continue as a self sustaining organization. we simply lack the tools under the law to solve the problems we face. if we are giving authority and the flexibility to quickly address our problems, we will do so. the board is directed to the management of the postal service exports and act upon every opportunity to generate new revenue and reduce cost. post
can live with that. many people believe this will make our information and economy quite safer. is a: catherine lotrionte professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. host: coming up, we will talk about an investigation into the gaps and oversight of compound pharmacies. today is saturday, april 20. we will be right back. >> i strongly urge you to come up with a number that tells this committee and the american people -- we have a responsibility as well. for you to say, we're just going to see how things turn out, he will determine the size of the 2014 force, i believe is a tragic and terrible this date for which we may pay a very heavy price -- mistake for which we may pay a very heavy price. tosenator, i didn't say leave it completely vague. we are advising and assisting at the battalion level. were going to lift off at the brigade level this fall. the 2014 number is inextricably linked to the number we believe we need to provide to assist post 2014. >> you have to wait till 201
in the current state of the economy. this is from fall of 2012. we will see if that changes post-boston and if those numbers go up. this goes to the earlier segment that you aired, this idea that the united states is complacent with respect to terrorism. i think the survey demonstrates it is among the things that iople think about your it also think that the law enforcement community is certainly not complacent when it comes to terrorism. the boston event was a security event. there's a lot of individuals covering that event, from federal, state and local. i don't think that boston happened due to complacency. i don't think we necessarily are complacent. i think we have accepted terrorism as a new facet of our reality, albeit one that does not happen that frequently. host: if you want to look at the start.u you can go to m.d.edd.edu to get more informa. nationaliff, from the consortium for the study of terrorism & responses to terrorism. caller: good morning. i think these turbo crimes are quite separate. two crimes are quite separate. the man in connecticut was concerning his di
it. >> in 1839, britain, at the moment it controls more of the world economy than it will ever do before or since, about 40% of world trade, go in and invades afghanistan. looks as if it's going to be incredibly easy. >> always does, doesn't it? >> they walk in as with many other subsequent invasions, looks as if everything's going to go very easy. within a few months they are busy ice skating. they brought their fox hounds. they've come up with 30 camels full of -- they brought three camels with cigars. one camel just carrying eau du cologne for the troops. all looks easy. within 18 months the most incredible jihad has been declared. the troops are completely surrounded. because they walked in so easily they haven't made any fortifications. they're surrounded on all sides by hills. the afghans capture their food and ammunition within about 48 hours. they shoot the deputy governor at the uprising. the main governor goes out to negotiate. he gets shot dead. you have a completely lead to this army without food, without ammunition in the middle of winter. all they can do is retreat.
'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. >>> welcome back to this special edition of "today" as we cover the aftermath of monday's bombings at the boston marathon. natalie is back with more on why this event means so much to this city. >> that's right, savannah, from many participants completing the race is a lifelong dream. it is known for its challenging hills and its enthusiastic crowds but this year it became the perfect target for terror. who could have predicted a race that began with the traditional starting gun would end with a pair of explosions. a city wide celebration transformed in an instant by an act of terrorism. >> everybody was excited, taking pictures and next thing you know it's just utter chaos. we were terrified and the only thing we could think of, is there another
i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there. ♪ wow. ♪ what? ♪ mmm. it looks delicious! i didn't work out this morning. i should try it? yeah. actually pretty tasty. sausage, egg and cheese. mmm! this is from special k? no way! that changes things. [ female announcer ] new special k flatbread breakfast sandwiches. with multi-grain flatbread, eggs, sausage, and cheese. it's only 240 calories. if you guys can come back tomorrow, it'd be fantastic. [ female announcer ] a breakfast revelation. what will you gain when you lose? for a strong bag that] a bgrips the can...ion. get glad forceflex. small change, big difference. [ female announcer ] resisting the magical taste of silky smooth dove® chocolate is difficult. but choosing which one is even harder. go! is difficult. olive garden's new buy one, t
that every day. we need jobs to get the economy going. >> steve: thanks for giving us the business today. >> that's what i do. every tuesday. >> steve: it is. thanks. meanwhile, a gun store offering a rifle give aways on facebook. its page mysteriously shut down. sounds like facebook is getting political, doesn't it? we'll talk about that. mike jarrett, see the interview that made them lose it on tv next hour. >> he is good looking. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. with the innovating and the transforming and the revolutionizing. it's enough to make you forget that you're flying five hundred miles an hour on a chair that just became a bed. you see, we're doing some changing of our own. ah, we can talk about it later. we're putting the wonder back into air travel, one innovation at a time. the new american is arriving. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think
could have kept going for a long time. he was determined to democratize the economy and politics ad bring a private initiative to the economy and ronald reagan realized you don't find out much about this at the library but he met with gorbachev and the almost agreed to nuclear disarmament. in the defense did redmon they were horrified by this and put a stop to it but he didn't go all the way when he had a chance to end the cold war especially the nuclear threat so you do find it's a hard core beliefs today if you remember the republican primaries of 2012 it was sent but long ago there were these republican candidates for the debate at the library and everyone said he sets the example of how america can be strong and use its power to defeat its enemies he did it with the soviet union and we should do it today in iran and we were right to try it in iraq. america should use its power to destroy its enemies. it worked in the cold war and will work in the middle east. you have about 29% of the american people that agree today. >> richard, did you want to say something? you're leaning for
it. i don't care if people predicted less revenue, less revenue means more revenue in economy. if you in an enormous boost to ththe con and we like under kennedy, like under coolidge and like under reagan when you reduced rates, sometimes you get more revenue. that is because the deal is to be. same with immigration. we make it harder on ourselves are the debt commission, we make it a lot harder to find a deal when it has a thousand moving parts but i think we should go with the things we agree on and boom, boom, boom. it's why the rate -- that's why the public is so upset with us. all the stuff we agree on we won't pass because we say that will be the sweeter for the bigger deal. which we never seem to be able to get to one that break up all these big deals into smaller deals? i tried to pass the stand these a, science and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by unanimous consent. than schumer came up and said no, but i will pass, how about passing mind by unanimous consent? i was quite. i would've let this go by unanimous consent. they would have been shocked. i t
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